Cat & Dog Vaccinations: Protecting Your Companion

For clarity on pet vaccinations and their importance in pets’ overall health, owners in Edgewater and Rodgers Park can come to us for answers. Over-vaccination is a serious concern, but so are the infectious diseases they help protect your pet against. At Broadway Animal Hospital, we never vaccinate your pet unless we need to and therefore, tailor cat & dog vaccinations to each pet individually. Keep in mind that some vaccines are required by law, while others are highly recommended, and others still only apply to certain pets. Sound confusing? Don’t worry, because we’re about to break it down.

Core and Non-Core Vaccines and What That Means

Core vaccines are those which benefit each and every pet, regardless of lifestyle. Some such as Rabies, are required by law, due to the dangers of the disease that is both fatal and easily transmissible between animals and humans. Others are highly recommended, not only for your own pet’s health but that of the area’s pet community.

Non-Core cat & dog vaccinations are administered depending on lifestyle. For a pet who is outdoors frequently, maybe hiking or traveling with you, certain vaccines can protect them from diseases they can pick up from natural sources and insects.

  • Dogs
    • DAPP (distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus, parainfluenza)
    • Rabies
  • Cats
    • FVRCP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, panleukopenia)
    • Rabies
  • Dogs
    • Leptospirosis (included in DAPP) – bacterial infection that is highly recommended in the city.
    • Lyme – tick-borne illness recommended for dogs who spend time outdoors, particularly in wooded areas.
    • Bordetella (kennel cough) – respiratory infection recommended for dogs who are often boarded, frequent dog parks, or take obedience training classes.
    • Canine Influenza – recommended for social dogs who are in close proximity to others, especially during any outbreak.
  • Cats
    • FeLV (feline leukemia virus) – recommended for cats who spend time outdoors and may therefore be in contact with infected stray cats.

Oral Bordetella vs. Injected Bordetella

Bordetella protects your dog against canine infectious respiratory disease and is usually administered every 6 months. Typically, it is given by injection, and while it produces a highly effective immune response, it also has unpleasant side-effects such as muscle soreness at the site of injection. With recent advances in veterinary medicine, we are pleased to offer our patients another option: an oral Bordetella. It works more effectively and is easier and less traumatizing to administer, so we feel it is a safer, better alternative for your dog.

Call us at (773) 756-5120 to schedule your pet's appointment today to receive updated cat & dog vaccinations or discuss lifestyle needs and your options.

woman petting dog